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WWE CEO Vince McMahon usually trains four days a week (depending on his work schedule) and trains each body part once a week. He alternates between “Heavy” and “Not-So-Heavy” days for each body part. He trains calves every third day and abs twice a week.

Vince posing by bench press

Day 1 - Chest and Triceps

Heavy Day

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In an article in Your Physique magazine (Sept 1950 issue), Alan talks about the general rules for a beginner to follow in putting together a muscle building program. He said:

"All you need to do is follow the right exercises, eat plenty of nourishing food and get as much rest and relaxation on your non training days as you possibly can." 

"Let's deal with the right exercises first. If you build a schedule around either the deep knee bend (squats) or the dead lift and take it from there, you are on the right track." 

"The fundamental movements such as the supine press (bench press) or any of its variants - bench presses of incline presses - , curls, rowing motions, squats, or dead lifts or leg presses combined with sets of bent arm pullovers, are the best." 

For the beginner - do 1 set of each exercise for the 1st month, 2 sets the second month, 3 sets the third month. Workout twice a week (e.g., Tue and Sat, or Mon and Fri). For the 1st workout, use light weights just to get used to the exercises. For the second workout, try to determine for each exercise the amount of weight you can handle to complete 8 reps (with good form) and no more. Then, at each successive workout, try to increase your reps by 1 or 2, until you reach the top of the rep range. At that point, add a little weight to the bar. Continue in this fashion for the course. Keep your focus on this process of increasing reps, then increasing poundage. This is how you use the principle of "progressive resistance." It is this process of gradually increasing your strength and poundage that will result in larger muscles!

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Below is video of Sergio Oliva Training his quads and hamstrings:

Buy his book for his life story and workout information in his own words. Click on book image to buy.

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Clarence Ross (October 26, 1923 – April 30, 2008) was a bodybuilder from the United States.Ross was born in Oakland, California on October 26, 1923, the second of the four children of Hershel Ross, a teamster, and his wife Jeannette Levi. His mother died when he was young, so he grew up in a series of foster homes. He started weight training at age 17, weighing 135 pounds at a height of 5'10". He was motivated by the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor to enlist in the Air Force, which he did on October 31, 1942 at San Francisco, and was then stationed in Las Vegas.

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Rachel McLish trained back twice a week. Below is her routine:

Pulley Row:

  • 3 warm-up sets of 15 reps
  • 3 sets of 5-8 reps

 

Pulley Row

 

Bent-over Row:

  • 3 sets of 5-8 reps

 

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Charles Atlas

 

Charles Atlas daily exercise routine he maintained until about age 77:

  • 50 knee bends
  • 100 sit-ups
  • 300 push-ups
  • Daily run on the beach

The last 2 years of his life he spent reading the bible and running on the beach.

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Click on images to view full size:

Cover Page

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From interview by Osmo Kiiha of The Iron Master (IM).

IM:  "How about a sample routine from the 1950s?"

Reg:  "I didn't have a favorite workout routine.  I have done every routine and every exercise in the book, but like most advanced trainers, I have found what exercises and what routines give me the best results.  What is good for one man isn't necessarily good for somebody else.  My bodyweight fluctuated between 230 and 245 during those years.  Here is a routine I used around 1956-1957 with good results:"

Deltoids and Upper Back

- Press Behind Neck 4-10 Sets, 5 Reps.

- Heavy Bent arm Lateral Raises 5-10 Sets, 10 Reps

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Cover of Booklet

 

When asked to “make a muscle” the average person invariably flexes his biceps. Bodybuilders are no different . . . big arms fascinate them more than any other body part.

I’m no different myself . . . I’ve admired big arms as long as I can remember, and have worked long and hard to get a pair. I’ve been amply rewarded for my labors in this direction, but not until I had spent many, many years experimenting with the various exercises and training principles covered in the course booklet.

Furthermore, the time I spent working for big arms was much longer than it need be for you. How often during my earlier training years I had wished for a book such as this, describing exactly the exercises and training methods! But I had to learn a lot of what I now know by trial and error, by luck, hope, and mistakes.

So, the purpose of this book is to spare you some false turns and blind alleys on the road to magnificent arms. With my own errors in mind, this booklet is written for you, so you can avoid them. Follow the course as laid out . . . the prescribed exercises, sets, repetitions, exercise style. Put real determination in your workouts, make this a turning point in your big arm training . . . you won’t regret it!

Best of luck.

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The following is the workout Bill Phillip's says he favors in his book 

Monday: Chest and Calves

Bench Press:

3 x 20 @ 135 lbs.

2 x 10 @ 225 lbs.

1 x 8 @ 275 lbs.

1 x 6 @ 295 lbs.

1 x 5 @ 315 lbs.

1 x 4 @ 335 lbs.

1 x 3 @ 355 lbs.

2 x 8 @ 295 lbs.

Incline Flys:

4 x 6-8 @ 70 lb. DB's

Flat Flys:

4 x 6-8 75 lb. DB's

Standing Calve Raise:

4 x 10 @ 400 lbs.

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Joe Weider Exercise Charts

Click on Image to view complete charts.

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Serge Nubret’s training routine was based on high volume of training. He was known to train for hours and when asked about this he said he loved bodybuilding. The foundation of his training philosophy was to use light to moderate weight for higher reps. Below is the workout routine he used.

 

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In the gym I always hear people talking about all the sacrificing they do when it comes to dieting. It is important to eat well but unless you’re competing, eating a slice of cake or pizza isn't going kill you. To build muscle we need sleep, food, and rest in-between workouts. If you want to get bigger eat more calories and if you want to get leaner eat less calories. Your training doesn't have to change. Working out the classic way of two to three times a week should be sufficient to obtain awesome muscular gains.

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Reg Park’s Beginner’s routine below was also used by Arnold Schwarzenegger in his late teens to get big. Reg Park trained using this routine 3 times a week and it comprised mainly of heavy compound movements done with his “5×5″ program. Reg Park advocated that sets 1 and 2 are to be warmups for sets 3,4 and 5.