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From Article in Strength & Health Magazine - August, 1962

 

There have been no secret exercises, no complex formulas - just the basic training. For you readers who are interested, Harold does the following exercises in the following order:

 

3 Sets Barbell Press Behind Neck

6 Sets of Barbell Bench Press, Wide Grip

3 Sets of Barbell Rowing

3 Sets of Chins Behind Neck

3 Sets of Cheating Barbell Curl

5 Sets of Triceps Kickbacks

3 Sets of Front Squats

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Lou Ferrigno quote: "From what I see, most people train one bodypart a week. I think you should do more that that, hit it twice a week. They’re also doing 20 sets, which is way too many. I believe you should do only 10 to 12 sets, max, per bodypart. After every 72 hours or so, you should hit that part again. You can rotate exercises.

 

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Chet Yorton experimented for a while with diferent weight lifting routines until he settle with the one he used for the rest of his career. He used a push-pull routine. Mondays he trained chest, shoulders and triceps. Tuesdays he trained back, biceps and legs. Then next day he would take it off and then repeat the routine. All exercises are 4 exercises per body part for 5 sets and 8-10 reps except chest. For chest he would use 300lbs for 100 reps total. So he would do sets until he reached 100 reps and then do 1 rep with 405.  Full workout below:

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The following is the workout Bill Phillip's says he favors in his book 

Monday: Chest and Calves

Bench Press:

3 x 20 @ 135 lbs.

2 x 10 @ 225 lbs.

1 x 8 @ 275 lbs.

1 x 6 @ 295 lbs.

1 x 5 @ 315 lbs.

1 x 4 @ 335 lbs.

1 x 3 @ 355 lbs.

2 x 8 @ 295 lbs.

Incline Flys:

4 x 6-8 @ 70 lb. DB's

Flat Flys:

4 x 6-8 75 lb. DB's

Standing Calve Raise:

4 x 10 @ 400 lbs.

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In the gym I always hear people talking about all the sacrificing they do when it comes to dieting. It is important to eat well but unless you’re competing, eating a slice of cake or pizza isn't going kill you. To build muscle we need sleep, food, and rest in-between workouts. If you want to get bigger eat more calories and if you want to get leaner eat less calories. Your training doesn't have to change. Working out the classic way of two to three times a week should be sufficient to obtain awesome muscular gains.

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Larry Scott (1938-2014) was diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease in 2010, and succumbed to complications from the disease on March 8, 2014. His contributions to health and fitness helped accelerate the growth of bodybuilding as a sport and as a life style. He was the first Mr. Olympia and a great teacher, he will be missed.

Larry Scott still had big arms later in life.

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Maurice Jones also known as the "Canadian Hercules" was an old-time, classic physique builder. Although he was not a physique contest competitor, he was regularly featured as an example of a well-rounded weight trainer in John McCallum’s writings.

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"Casey trains three times a week, working the whole body in one workout lasting about 2 to 2½ hours. He employs the Nautilus machine mainly for the arms and lats and conventional barbell and dumbell movements for the rest of the body. When he trains on the conventional exercises he does some of them one after the other without much rest. That is why he is able to train his whole body thoroughly and in such a short time."
 
Here is Casey’s three day a week routine:
 

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York Barbell Course Part 1

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Leroy Colbert's Workout Routine

Click on image for larger view

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Jack Lalanne was a pioneer in advocating the need to exercise and be fit. He led by example and was known as "the godfather of fitness". He lived to be 96, which is something I fear many current bodybuilders won't reach. His workout and healthy eating lifestyle is a classic example of what true classic physique training can accomplish for health and vitality.

1) Exercise and Nutrition. " …Exercise is king. Nutrition is queen. Put them together and you've got a kingdom!" 

 

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Bill Star's 5X5 program has spawned many variations over the years but his workout is still highly regarded. Before Bill Star of course there was Reg Park whose 5X5 program inspired Arnold Schwarzenegger and helped Arnold build his size and strength. Bill Star's program is different in that it focuses on what he called the "big three": bench press, power clean and squats. He also utilizes shoulder press, dead lift and other exercises to completely strengthen the body. He also had heavy, medium and light training days. Check out his highly regarded workouts below.