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Trained entire body with a two-day, double-split routine:

DAY 1

6:00a.m. - Lats, Traps, Lower back

11:00a.m. - Ride bike for one hour

2:00p.m. - Run two miles

6:00p.m. - Chest, Front, thighs

10:00p.m. - Ride bike for one hour

DAY 2

6:00a.m. - Delts, Biceps, Triceps

11:00a.m. - Ride bike for one hour

2:00p.m. - Run two miles

6:00p.m. - Leg biceps, Calves, Abs

10:00p.m. - Ride bike for one hour

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"Casey trains three times a week, working the whole body in one workout lasting about 2 to 2½ hours. He employs the Nautilus machine mainly for the arms and lats and conventional barbell and dumbell movements for the rest of the body. When he trains on the conventional exercises he does some of them one after the other without much rest. That is why he is able to train his whole body thoroughly and in such a short time."
 
Here is Casey’s three day a week routine:
 

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Cover of Booklet

 

When asked to “make a muscle” the average person invariably flexes his biceps. Bodybuilders are no different . . . big arms fascinate them more than any other body part.

I’m no different myself . . . I’ve admired big arms as long as I can remember, and have worked long and hard to get a pair. I’ve been amply rewarded for my labors in this direction, but not until I had spent many, many years experimenting with the various exercises and training principles covered in the course booklet.

Furthermore, the time I spent working for big arms was much longer than it need be for you. How often during my earlier training years I had wished for a book such as this, describing exactly the exercises and training methods! But I had to learn a lot of what I now know by trial and error, by luck, hope, and mistakes.

So, the purpose of this book is to spare you some false turns and blind alleys on the road to magnificent arms. With my own errors in mind, this booklet is written for you, so you can avoid them. Follow the course as laid out . . . the prescribed exercises, sets, repetitions, exercise style. Put real determination in your workouts, make this a turning point in your big arm training . . . you won’t regret it!

Best of luck.

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Denny and Robby Triceps and Forearms

Click on image to view PDF

 

 

Sources:

Muscle Builder Training Partner Series Part 2 with Deny gable and Robby Robinson

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This is the same workout that Reg Park trained with to win the 1951 Mr. Universe title. 
 

Reg trained three days a week on this routine:

 

Squats 5 x 10

Bench Press 5 x 10

Weighted Dips 5 x 12

Barbell Curls 5 x 10

French Presses 5 x 10

Chins 5 x 10

Donkey Raises 5 sets

Abs 5 sets

 

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Workout principle 1: The progressive overload principle

In order to increase one aspect of physical fitness (strength, muscle mass, stamina, etc.), the muscles must be subjected to more stress than usual. This means that the muscles need to be continually put under increased stress. In order to achieve more strength, heavier weights must be used. In order to achieve more muscle mass, not only do heavier weights need to be used but the number of sets and the number of training units also need to be increased.

Muscle stamina is best improved by shortening the rest between sets or by constantly increasing the number of reps or sets. The progressive overload principle is the core of all physical training and forms a solid basis for successful strength training (super-compensation).

 

Workout principle 2: The set system principle

In the early years of bodybuilding, most experts believed that wannabe bodybuilders should only complete one set of each exercise per workout. If the whole body is to complete twelve exercises, this would mean twelve sets per training unit.

Joe Weider saw things differently. He was the first to recommend working out using several sets of one exercise (sometimes up to three or four sets per exercise) in order to fully exhaust each muscle group and to stimulate maximum muscle growth.

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Below is a qoute from Robby Robinson’s book The Black Prince, he describes the workout routines he and the other champions used at Gold’s Gym back in the golden era of 1970's:

 

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Arnold's Biceps Routine:

Barbell Curl (Standing): 5 Sets of 8,8,6,6,6 Reps

Arnold barbell curls

Dumbell Curl (Sitting): 5 Sets of Reps

Arnold  Dumbbell Curls

Restricted Inclined Dumbbell Curl: 5 Sets of 10 Reps

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In the gym I always hear people talking about all the sacrificing they do when it comes to dieting. It is important to eat well but unless you’re competing, eating a slice of cake or pizza isn't going kill you. To build muscle we need sleep, food, and rest in-between workouts. If you want to get bigger eat more calories and if you want to get leaner eat less calories. Your training doesn't have to change. Working out the classic way of two to three times a week should be sufficient to obtain awesome muscular gains.

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At Rippeder.com our focus is on classic physiques from the 50's, 60's, 70's and 80's but the Mr. Olympia is the pinnacle of all bodybuilding competition and so we look on with support to our fellow bodybuilders. This years' Mr. Olympia featured some great bodybuilders. In the end it was between the best two modern physiques of Kai Green and Phil Heath. The 2013 Mr. Olympia should be interesting with Jay Cutler back in the mix.

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Biceps Routine:

No. 1 - Regular Barbell Curls:  5 Sets of 10 Reps

No. 2 - Seated Alternate Dumbell Curl: 5 Sets of 10 Reps

No. 3 - Close Grip Barbell Curl: 4 Sets of 8 Reps

No. 4 - Concentration Pulley Curls: 5 Sets of 10 Reps

Triceps Routine:

No. 1 - Seated Press From Behind The Neck: 4 Sets of 8 Reps

No. 2 - Parallel Bar Dips: 2 Sets of as many reps as possible

No. 3 - Standing Triceps Extension With Close Grip: 4 Sets of 8 Reps

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Below is the Brawn workout Routine.

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Tommy Kono was a tremendously talented weightlifter who was a world and Olympic champion for the United States back in the fifties.

Kono stated that back in 1952 when he was training for the Olympics (Kono won the lightweight gold medal that year), he would train three days a week on only four exercises, and equal or exceed world record totals during his training.

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Bill's intermediate to advanced training routines includes training 4 times per week maximum, with each workout session lasting about 1.5 hours. Read full workout below:

 

 

Bill trains his different muscle groups as follows:

 

 Mondays: chest, back and shoulders (super-sets for chest and back)

 Tuesdays: Arms and legs (super-sets for arms)

 Wednesday: off

 Thursday: repeat Monday